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Obesity and angiolymphatic invasion in primary breast cancer.

TitleObesity and angiolymphatic invasion in primary breast cancer.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsGillespie, EF, Sorbero, ME, Hanauer, DA, Sabel, MS, Herrmann, EJ, Weiser, LJ, Jagielski, CH, Griggs, JJ
JournalAnn Surg Oncol
Volume17
Issue3
Pagination752-9
Date Published2010 Mar
ISSN1534-4681
KeywordsAdult, Body Mass Index, Breast Neoplasms, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Hormone Replacement Therapy, Humans, Hypertension, Lymphatic Metastasis, Menopause, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Staging, Obesity, Receptor, ErbB-2, Receptors, Estrogen, Receptors, Progesterone, Survival Rate, Treatment Outcome, Vascular Neoplasms, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with poorer breast cancer-specific survival. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between obesity and the presence of angiolymphatic invasion as well as other features of invasive breast cancer, including stage at presentation, estrogen receptor (ER) status, triple-negative phenotype, and tumor grade.METHODS: Detailed clinical and pathologic data were abstracted from the medical records of all 1,312 patients with stage I-III primary breast cancer who had breast surgery at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2006. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to investigate the relationships between body mass index and tumor biologic features, controlling for menopausal status, diabetes and hypertension, hormone replacement therapy before diagnosis, race, and ethnicity.RESULTS: In multivariate analyses, severe obesity was independently associated with the presence of angiolymphatic invasion [odds ratio (OR) 1.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-2.99, joint test of significance, P = 0.03]. Severe obesity was associated with lower likelihood of triple-negative breast cancer (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.16-0.96). Among premenopausal women with diabetes, ER-negative (OR 5.22, 95% CI 1.12-24.29) and triple-negative (OR 14.8, 95% CI 1.92-113.91) disease was significantly more common.DISCUSSION: In this large sample of invasive breast cancers, obesity was independently associated with the presence of angiolymphatic invasion. Higher rates of angiolymphatic invasion among obese women may account in part for poorer outcomes among obese women with breast cancer.

DOI10.1245/s10434-009-0797-6
Alternate JournalAnn. Surg. Oncol.
PubMed ID19898898
Grant ListR01 CA092444 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
R01 CA922444-01 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
People: 
David Hanauer
University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center at North Campus Reserach Complex
1600 Huron Parkway, Bldg 100, Rm 100 
Mailing Address: 2800 Plymouth Rd, NCRC 100-1004
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2800 
Ph. (734) 764-8848 Fax. (734) 615-0517
Please acknowledge the Cancer Center Support Grant (P30 CA046592) when publishing manuscripts or abstracts that utilized the services of the University of Michigan's Comprehensive Cancer Center's Shared Resource: Cancer Informatics.
Suggested language: "Research reported in this [publication/press release] was supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under award number P30CA046592."

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