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Describing the relationship between cat bites and human depression using data from an electronic health record.

TitleDescribing the relationship between cat bites and human depression using data from an electronic health record.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsHanauer, DA, Ramakrishnan, N, Seyfried, LS
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue8
Paginatione70585
Date Published2013
ISSN1932-6203
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Bites and Stings, Cats, Data Mining, Depression, Dogs, Electronic Health Records, Female, Humans, Male, Medical Informatics, Mice, Middle Aged, Rats, Young Adult
Abstract

Data mining approaches have been increasingly applied to the electronic health record and have led to the discovery of numerous clinical associations. Recent data mining studies have suggested a potential association between cat bites and human depression. To explore this possible association in more detail we first used administrative diagnosis codes to identify patients with either depression or bites, drawn from a population of 1.3 million patients. We then conducted a manual chart review in the electronic health record of all patients with a code for a bite to accurately determine which were from cats or dogs. Overall there were 750 patients with cat bites, 1,108 with dog bites, and approximately 117,000 patients with depression. Depression was found in 41.3% of patients with cat bites and 28.7% of those with dog bites. Furthermore, 85.5% of those with both cat bites and depression were women, compared to 64.5% of those with dog bites and depression. The probability of a woman being diagnosed with depression at some point in her life if she presented to our health system with a cat bite was 47.0%, compared to 24.2% of men presenting with a similar bite. The high proportion of depression in patients who had cat bites, especially among women, suggests that screening for depression could be appropriate in patients who present to a clinical provider with a cat bite. Additionally, while no causative link is known to explain this association, there is growing evidence to suggest that the relationship between cats and human mental illness, such as depression, warrants further investigation.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0070585
Alternate JournalPLoS ONE
PubMed ID23936453
PubMed Central IDPMC3731284
Grant List2UL1TR000433-06 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
CA46592 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
People: 
David Hanauer
University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center at North Campus Reserach Complex
1600 Huron Parkway, Bldg 100, Rm 100 
Mailing Address: 2800 Plymouth Rd, NCRC 100-1004
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2800 
Ph. (734) 764-8848 Fax. (734) 615-0517
Please acknowledge the Cancer Center Support Grant (P30 CA046592) when publishing manuscripts or abstracts that utilized the services of the University of Michigan's Comprehensive Cancer Center's Shared Resource: Cancer Informatics.
Suggested language: "Research reported in this [publication/press release] was supported by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under award number P30CA046592."

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